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[ fAAAmily ]

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Hi there. We're the Harvard-Radcliffe Asian American Association, and this is our little space on Tumblr. It's so nice to meet you.

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[visit our official AAA website here.]

twitter.com/HarvardAAA:

    dear freshmen,

    i am shamelessly sitting at an airport in japan creeping on your harvard college facebook profiles and gathering all your info in a google doc because board wants to share the fAAAm love with you all

    i’m not even sorry

    SEE YOU GUYS SOON! :)

    — 1 year ago
    #harvard  #aaa 
    Hey there, Tumblr! Have you guys checked us out on Facebook yet? If not, it’s definitely worth dropping by and giving us a like— you’ll get all things AAA straight to your newsfeed.
Anyway, we really can’t wait to share the exciting year ahead with all of you!
FAAAm love,Your 2012 Board

    Hey there, Tumblr! Have you guys checked us out on Facebook yet? If not, it’s definitely worth dropping by and giving us a like— you’ll get all things AAA straight to your newsfeed.

    Anyway, we really can’t wait to share the exciting year ahead with all of you!

    FAAAm love,
    Your 2012 Board

    — 1 year ago
    #harvard  #asian american  #aaa  #facebook  #college 
    A Question of Identity →

    These have been a revealing two weeks, not only for the Asian American community or the Ivy League basketball community or the talent evaluator committee, but also for watchdogs, handwringers, and pulpit-thumpers. Not since Barack Obama’s presidential campaign has there been so much national discussion about the appropriateness of discussing race. The 2008 election set the groundwork for an aggressive sort of colorblindness — as long as you voted for Barack and/or can celebrate, say, Jackie Robinson, you now have the right to flag down anything that might shake us from our post-racial dream. Statements like “I see everybody equally, therefore everyone should just talk about him as a basketball player” and accusations of “playing the race card” have become even more ubiquitous. And although the former signals a nice sentiment, it also provides convenient cover for those of us who benefit most from the status quo, regardless of race. Yes, Jeremy Lin became Linsanity because he has been playing at a level that has recalibrated expectations of any obscure player. And yes, there’s nothing more tiresome than a long-winded meditation on a basketball player, especially if he’s clearly been hijacked to promote some other agenda. But to strip Jeremy Lin of his status as the Great Yellow Hope not only seems dishonest and lazy, it also deprives the community he represents — willfully or not — of the unabashed joy of seeing one of its own succeed in the most improbable arena.

    — 2 years ago
    #Jeremy Lin  #Harvard  #AAA  #Asian American 
    History of AAA

    Our retreat began with our biannual reading of the AAA history, a perfect and always necessary reminder of our roots and mission. While AAA has grown and changed over time, we still hold on to the basic ideas upon which we were founded: a dedication to awareness of Asian American issues through social, political, educational, and cultural events. We invite you to read our history as well - we think you’ll find it as inspirational as we do. 

    AAA HISTORY

    Rejection gave birth to the Asian American Association. During first-year orientation week in 1976, two Asian American women decided to attend a Minority Freshman Banquet sponsored by the university, but were barred from entering and were turned away.

    Harvard did not recognize Asian Americans as a minority, despite the legacy of legal discrimination and social prejudice they share with other minority groups. Asian Americans were acknowledged as minorities by the federal government and by Harvard in enrollment reports it filed in order to receive federal affirmative-action funding. But the administration embraced the racist notion of Asian Americans as an assimilated, financially secure “model minority” and therefore not a true “minority.”

    Read more
    — 2 years ago with 7 notes
    #history  #AAA  #retreat